In Other Golf News

2020 U.S. Open: Viewer’s guide, TV times, how to watch

Spotlight shines on Winged Foot, where A.W. Tillinghast's West Course will be the site of 44 hours of live TV coverage this week

This year’s second major championship, the 120th U.S. Open at Winged Foot Golf Club, is (finally) upon us. Golf balls will be in the air at the U.S. Open 92 days later than originally scheduled, thanks to the global coronavirus pandemic (tee times) . It’s the first time the U.S. Open won’t be played in June since 1931, when the championship was held in early July at Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio.

Interestingly, the U.S. Open has been played seven times in September or October. And the last time it was played in September was 1913, during Francis Ouimet’s historic playoff victory at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. Other alterations to the U.S. Open include no open qualifying, a smaller field, no fans onsite and the return of network broadcaster NBC.

The U.S. Open returns to Winged Foot’s historic West Course for the first time since 2006 and for the club’s sixth Open overall. Its storied opens were Bobby Jones’ playoff victory over Al Espinosa in 1929; Billy Casper’s one-stroke win over Bob Rosburg in 1959; Hale Irwin’s victory in 1974 (11 years after Irwin won his first U.S. Open); Fuzzy Zoeller’s playoff defeat of Greg Norman in 1984; and that 2006 Open, when Geoff Ogilvy outlasted Jim Furyk, Colin Montgomerie and Phil Mickelson.

The West and East courses were designed by A.W. Tillinghast, aka “Tillie the Terror.” The West opened for play in 1923. The late Tillinghast, with more than 250 design credits, can’t necessarily be pigeonholed with any singular architectural feature. However, after a restoration by Gil Hanse that was completed in 2017, the West Course features green complexes that will be the star of this week’s show. They’re bold, treacherous and spotlight some of the greatest contours in championship golf. Making them hard and fast only complicates the equation for PGA Tour pros.

Fun facts:
· The average age of the 144-player field is a smidge over 31 years old.

· There are 36 players in the field competing in their first U.S. Open. The last person to win in his Open debut was Francis Ouimet (1913).

· Based on the course setup for the championship, the course rating is 76.9 and the slope rating is 146.

· There are 15 players in the field this week who competed in the 2006 U.S. Open, seven of whom missed the cut, including Tiger Woods, Matt Kuchar, Sergio Garcia and Zach Johnson.

· This will be the 20th U.S. Open contested in New York.

· With no local and final qualifying this year, the USGA used 28 exemption categories to fill the field, which includes 10 past champions and 13 amateurs.

· Sergio Garcia, the 40-year-old Spaniard, holds the longest active streak of consecutive U.S. Open appearances. He will be making his 21st consecutive Open start, dating to 2000 at Pebble Beach.

In June, the U.S. media rights for USGA championships were transferred from Fox Sports back to NBC, effective immediately and through 2026. With 44 hours of live coverage, the U.S. Open will be everywhere this week across TV and digital platforms. Those viewing options include Golf Channel, NBC, USOpen.com, and the newly launched Peacock app.

U.S. Open TV schedule:

Day
Time (EDT)
Network
Coverage
Thursday
7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

Golf Channel
First round

2-5 p.m.

NBC
First round

5-7 p.m.

Peacock
First round
Friday
7:30-9:30 a.m.

Peacock
Second round

9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
Golf Channel
Second round

4-7 p.m.
NBC
Second round
Saturday
9-11 a.m.
Peacock
Third round

11 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
NBC
Third round
Sunday
8-10 a.m.

Peacock
Fourth round

10 a.m.-Noon

Golf Channel
Fourth round

Noon-6 p.m.

NBC
Fourth round

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