From The Inbox

Mixed results define golf’s return to TV

A great idea falls victim to so-so work from NBC and a couple of forgettable guest appearances

A-plus for the idea but a C-minus for NBC's execution (“NBC, Seminole shine as PGA Tour stars boost coronavirus aid,” May 18).

It had been at least 45 minutes since I had seen an interview telling me how great the economy was a couple months ago and who was to blame for the coronavirus, and I had almost forgotten; so, thanks for the reminder. I won't even bother to comment on whatever that was with Bill Murray.

Anyone who tuned in to this match just wanted to see some live golf on a course we have never seen, not a political speech or interview with a boorish “celebrity.” It would have been nice to hear more of the players interacting with one another.

At least it was better than Jim Nantz’s revealing the winner 10 minutes into the telecast and asking players about shots they couldn't remember.

Tom Wise
West Chester, Ohio

More so-so grades
Seminole Golf Club is really nice, and it was a treat to see it (“NBC, Seminole shine as PGA Tour stars boost coronavirus aid,” May 18).

As usual, the announcing was boring and inane. The golfers showed some rust except in a few spurts. Overall, I give the golf a C-plus/B-minus. They did a fine job in raising a large amount of money for two very good causes, and the players are to be commended. For that reason, they get an A-plus.

The people who donated money are to be commended also. The front-line workers are the real heroes during this time of trouble. They put their lives on the line for us.

Michael Merrill
McKinney, Texas

It’s the Golden Age of massive tee shots
It was indeed great to see live golf again on TV (“NBC, Seminole shine as PGA Tour stars boost coronavirus aid,” May 18).

The play at times was suspect, but what was not was the extremely long tee shots consistently hit by the group. This exhibition certainly highlighted the need to roll back distance. At least eight par 4s were hit by wedges, and one 400-yard hole was almost reached.

If we are to allow the ball to continue traveling these hyper distances, we no doubt will render many of the Golden Age courses, Seminole included, obsolete.

Major League Baseball has had to face a similar issue. Through logical governance of its game, Boston’s Fenway Park is still relevant.

I hope that golf’s governing bodies overseeing our great game have the fortitude to do the same.

John Douglas
Vero Beach, Fla.

Finding the range on pace of play
I enjoyed the match Sunday, and being able to see Seminole Golf Club for the first time was a treat (“NBC, Seminole shine as PGA Tour stars boost coronavirus aid,” May 18).

What also was enjoyable was the pace of play, though the foursome did not finish by 6 o'clock. What helped was the use of rangefinders.

With all the complaining over the years about slow play, the use of rangefinders was not cheating. It's time to use them on the PGA Tour.

Gregg Clymer
Goodyear, Ariz.

Crying Wolfe
John Hawkins described Sunday’s exhibition at Seminole Golf Club as “meaningless golf,” and he was right (“NBC, Seminole shine as PGA Tour stars boost coronavirus aid,” May 18).

Most guys I know found it uninteresting, and Matthew Wolfe’s being in it contributed to the boredom. Wolfe’s demeanor was a bit much, considering his resume. But, it was nice to see the other guys who played for free, like the rest of us.

Larry Ashe
Chicago

‘A good watch spoiled’
The inclusion of President Donald Trump in Sunday’s golf coverage was totally unnecessary (“NBC, Seminole shine as PGA Tour stars boost coronavirus aid,” May 18).

The telecast became a good watch spoiled.

Walt DelGiorno
Wilmington, Del.

Executive disorder
It would have been fine if President Donald Trump had kept his comments about golf, but when he started campaigning and lying about not playing golf since “this thing started,” that tetanus shot was under the finger nails and ruined the next half hour of the broadcast (“NBC, Seminole shine as PGA Tour stars boost coronavirus aid,” May 18).

John Ronshagen
Rolesville, N.C.

Morning Read invites reader comment. Write to editor Steve Harmon at steve@morningread.com. Please provide your name and city of residence. If your comment is selected for publication, Morning Read will contact you to verify the authenticity of the email and confirm your identity. We will not publish your email address. We reserve the right to edit for clarity and brevity.

Sign up to receive the Morning Read newsletter, along with Where To Golf Next and The Equipment Insider.